Nursing & Public Health

 

Sample Careers
Registered Nurse  What you'll do: Registered nurses provide and coordinate patient care, educate their patients about various health conditions, and provide advice and emotional support to family members and patients. Registered nurses work in hospitals, physicians’ offices, home healthcare services, and nursing home facilities. To be a registered nurse you need an associate’s degree in Nursing to begin and eventually a bachelor’s degree with New York State’s new “BSN in 10” law. Questions? Ask Krystal Jubilee
Gerontologists  What you'll do: Gerontologists conduct research and study the factors that affect the aging process. Some gerontologists work directly with older individuals and help with day-to-day activities. Entry-level gerontologists typically work in nursing homes and in senior care centers. Start at SUNY CCC with this program: Community and Public Health Questions? Ask Deb Beall
Pharmacists  What you'll do: Most pharmacists work in a community setting, such as a retail drugstore, or in a healthcare facility, such as a hospital. Pharmacists in community pharmacies dispense medications, counsel patients on the use of prescription and over-the-counter medications, and advise physicians about medication therapy. SUNY CCC has partnerships with St. John Fisher and University at Buffalo for PharmD programs. Questions? Ask Dave Pindel
Health Education Specialist What you'll do: Health education specialists work with individuals as well as public and private organizations to create, implement, oversee, and analyze programs and strategies that promote health and well-being. Health education specialists can be found in a variety of settings, including schools and universities, government offices, businesses, hospitals, clinics, and more. Start at SUNY CCC with this program: Community and Public Health Education. Questions? Ask Elaine Corwin
Registered Dietician What you'll do: Registered dietitian nutritionists design nutrition programs to protect health, prevent allergic reactions and alleviate the symptoms of many types of disease. Clinical dietitians provide medical nutrition therapy for patients in institutions such as hospitals and nursing care facilities. Start at SUNY CCC with this program: Community and Public Health. Questions? Ask Elaine Corwin